About

Ian Ozsvald picture

This is Ian Ozsvald's blog, I'm an entrepreneurial geek, a Data Science/ML/NLP/AI consultant, founder of the Annotate.io social media mining API, author of O'Reilly's High Performance Python book, co-organiser of PyDataLondon, co-founder of the SocialTies App, author of the A.I.Cookbook, author of The Screencasting Handbook, a Pythonista, co-founder of ShowMeDo and FivePoundApps and also a Londoner. Here's a little more about me.

High Performance Python book with O'Reilly View Ian Ozsvald's profile on LinkedIn Visit Ian Ozsvald's data science consulting business Protecting your bits. Open Rights Group

18 August 2012 - 0:51EuroSciPy2012 Parallel Python tutorial requirements now online

My EuroSciPy 2012 Parallel Python tutorial requirements are online in this github repo. If you’re coming to my tutorial next Thursday please make sure everything is installed beforehand. The repo includes the slides (not quite yet finished) and a ‘solutions/’ directory which you shouldn’t peek at (that’s there in case we run behind in the tutorial). In the course we’ll cover:

  • multiprocessing
  • parallelpython
  • gearman
  • picloud
  • ipython cluster

This course builds on the Mandelbrot example from my previous High Performance Python course. As noted at the end of the slides I’m probably looking for some long-running consultancy work around Parallel Python/High Performance Python work around London (or maybe Euro/US areas) as the start-up I took to StartupChile didn’t work out. I’m in California at present, returning to London to stay in October.

Also – I’m thinking of writing an updated High Performance+Parallel Python guide (probably as a self-published book) that builds on my original 55 page High Performance Python guide, if you’re interested in hearing about it please join the High Performance Python Mailing List (I’ve only got a list right now). I’ll make an announce once I know more.


Ian applies Data Science as an AI/Data Scientist for companies in ModelInsight and Mor Consulting, founded the image and text annotation API Annotate.io, co-authored SocialTies, programs Python, authored The Screencasting Handbook, lives in London and is a consumer of fine coffees.

No Comments | Tags: Python

6 August 2012 - 3:47Kinect depth maps and Python

I had the opportunity to play with a Kinect over the weekend, I wanted to test out depth mapping using the built in infra red cameras. Using a structured light approach is different to the stereopsis approach I was looking at with Kyran recently.

Using the open source drivers for Ubuntu I quickly got the basic depth sensing demo running. Here’s Emily in our living room:

According to the wikipedia entry the Kinect has a depth resolution of approximately 1.3mm, below is a shot of my laptop with a few objects in the background and you can just about make out the bevelling around the edge of the keys:

I’m particularly interested in using Python’s numpy and the openCV bindings for depth measurement, these simple instructions don’t work for me (grr!) as I can’t get the freenect library on Ubuntu 11.10 to recognise the Kinect (even though it obviously runs fine using the OpenNI drivers!). I tried using Ubuntu 12.04 in a VirtualBox but apparently VM solutions don’t work with the Kinect due to some USB limitations :-(

However using the PyOpenNI drivers works fine on Ubuntu 11.04. libfreenect continues to insist that I have no Kinect but the PyOpenNI drivers work just fine.

Here I have 3 shots showing a bottle, box of granola, table further back and some furniture behind. I progressively reduce the depth so we only see the foreground bottle & granola box by the last image. These shots are taken using PyOpenNI, numpy and matplotlib:

There’s a cool video for using dual Kinects together to remove some of the blind spots and to build a better 3D model:

 

It looks like the Kinect 2 is a year or two away yet.


Ian applies Data Science as an AI/Data Scientist for companies in ModelInsight and Mor Consulting, founded the image and text annotation API Annotate.io, co-authored SocialTies, programs Python, authored The Screencasting Handbook, lives in London and is a consumer of fine coffees.

2 Comments | Tags: Life, Python